Sep 192012
 

The material in this blog entry is a chapter from an unfinished book begun years ago. No editing has been done to the material as of it’s cut and pasting on 1-7-12. )

The Scroll View of the body is related to both the Double Cylinder View of the body and the Layer View of the body. A scroll consists of two cylinders around which a piece of paper is wrapped. The cylinders are rotated one way or the other in order to reveal different sections of the paper. Here is an example picture of a scroll.

There are two types of scrolls. The first type is like the one above. The paper is wrapped on the cylinders so that the paper is on the rear of both cylinders. The picture below is looking down on the tops of both cylinders.

On the second type of scroll, the paper runs from the back of one cylinder to the front of the other cylinder. The paper forms a diagonal from front to back between the two cylinders.

Happeh Theory says that all human inventions are based on some aspect of the human body. According to Happeh Theory, the reading scroll is based on the double cylinders of the Double Cylinder View of the body, and the layer of fibers that connect them together in real life. Here is an overhead view of the double cylinders of the Double Cylinder View of the body .

The cylinders are centered approximately on the shoulders and their edges meet in the center of the body. According to the Double Cylinder View of the body, the double cylinders are constructed from layers that are wound in a spiral about the center of the cylinder. The double cylinders of the body are constructed like the towels on a roll of paper towels or the paper on a roll of toilet paper.

From above, the spirals of the double cylinders would look something like this.

The only thing that needs to be done to change the independent spirals of each cylinder into a scroll is to connect the spirals.

Here is a picture comparing the connected layers of the double cylinders from the Double Cylinder View of the body on top, and the overhead view of a scroll with the paper running from the front of one scroll cylinder to the rear of the other scroll cylinder on the bottom.

The double cylinders in the body and the layers connecting them behave in real life like the type of scroll in which the paper travels from the front of one scroll cylinder to the rear of the other scroll cylinder. The body behaves as if these layers are traveling on a diagonal from the chest of one side of the body to the back of the other side of the body.

In the picture above, the layers on the cylinders run from the front of the left cylinder to the rear of the right cylinder. Or from the right chest to the left back. There are actually two spirals on each cylinder. Each is layered in the opposite way from the other. The picture below shows the two opposing sets of layers that connect the double cylinders.

In real life, the layers of fibers within the body do not physically move from side to side as the paper on a scroll does. Instead, the layers will tighten or loosen about the cylinder on which they are wound. The body will provide sensations that feel as if something is moving from one cylinder to the other. According to Happeh Theory, it is these sensations that are responsible for the invention of the paper reading scroll.

If the reading scroll is based on the layers of fibers in the human body which run on a diagonal from front to back, why is there a type of scroll with the paper running from back to back of both cylinders?

According to Happeh Theory, the reason was real world usefulness. If a scroll is constructed so that the paper runs from back to back of both cylinders, when the scroll is set on a flat surface, the paper is completely supported by the flat surface that it is resting on.

If the paper runs from the back of one cylinder to the front of the other cylinder, there is a gap between the paper at one end of the cylinder and the surface on which the cylinders are resting. The paper is not supported by anything when it is close to the upper part of the cylinder.

Any pressure on the paper that is not supported by the flat surface could cause the paper to tear or rip. According to Happeh Theory, this real world problem is why the paper on a scroll sometimes runs from back to back, instead of from front to back like the layers within the human body on which the scroll was modeled on.

 

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)