Sep 112012
 

The purpose of this series of blog entries is to prove anyone can create anything. Many people who are exposed to Happeh Theory feel it cannot be treated seriously because the creator is not the type of individual that generates unquestioning trust in others the way others seem to give scientists with degrees unquestioning trust.

It is hoped that the examples of regular people creating or inventing things will give confidence to the individual who doubts Happeh Theory. If regular people in these examples can produce creations that scientists agree are worthwhile and valid, the reader must admit it is entirely within the realm of possibility that the claims of Happeh Theory will eventually be validated by scientists as well.

The news story that is the focus of this blog entry reports on a 16 year old who solved a 300 year old math problem. What is especially relevant about this example is that the teenager’s high school teachers refused to accept his work. The teenager was forced to go to a higher university to get his worked validated.

The situation with Happeh Theory is similar. People who are unable to comprehend Happeh Theory insist it must be false, like the teenager’s high school teachers insisted his work had no merit. It will take people who are the equivalent of higher university people in the story to understand Happeh Theory and give it their stamp of approval. 

The original news story is reprinted next.

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A 16-year-old Iraqi immigrant living in Sweden has cracked a maths puzzle that has stumped experts for more than 300 years, Swedish media reported on Thursday.

In just four months, Mohamed Altoumaimi has found a formula to explain and simplify the so-called Bernoulli numbers, a sequence of calculations named after the 17th century Swiss mathematician Jacob Bernoulli, the Dagens Nyheter daily said.

Altoumaimi, who came to Sweden six years ago, said teachers at his high school in Falun, central Sweden were not convinced about his work at first.

“When I first showed it to my teachers, none of them thought the formula I had written down really worked,” Altoumaimi told the Falu Kuriren newspaper.

He then got in touch with professors at Uppsala University, one of Sweden’s top institutions, to ask them to check his work.

After going through his notebooks, the professors found his work was indeed correct and offered him a place in Uppsala.

But for now, Altoumaimi is focusing on his school studies and plans to take summer classes in advanced mathematics and physics this year.

“I wanted to be a researcher in physics or mathematics; I really like those subjects. But I have to improve in English and social sciences,” he told the Falu Kuriren.

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