Jul 212012
 

The news story that this blog is based on reports that vibrating the body built bone mass.

This news story belongs in the Happeh Theory For the Scholar section because the description of the process that takes place corroborates the claims of Happeh Theory.

A large number of theoretical models of the human body have been created to help present the concepts of Happeh Theory. One of those theoretical models is called “The Fiber View Of The Human Body”, which states “the human body can be treated as if it is created from fibers”. Another theoretical model of the human body is known as “The Spiral View Of The Human Body”, which states “the human body can be treated as if it is created from spirals”.

The description of the process taking place when the body is vibrated includes the statement “the cell nucleus, which is suspended by numerous threadlike fibers called filaments”, which corroborates the claims of The Fiber View Of The Human Body.

The description of the process also states “The filaments get all deformed like springs and then they spring back”, which corroborates the claims of The Spiral View Of The Human Body.

That corroboration between the claims of Happeh Theory and the real life construction and behavioral details of the human body strengthen the validity of Happeh Theory.

The original news story is reprinted next.

It has long been known that exercise helps build bone density and prevent age-related bone loss and fractures. Now, a new study has found that an age-old exercise that dates back around 200 years can help seniors literally shake their way to better bone health and prevent bone density loss, fractures, disability and death.

In the new study just published in the journal Bone, researchers at the Medical College of Georgia (MCG) found that 12 weeks of daily 30-minute vibration improved bone density around the hip joint, femur and long leg bone in mature mice equal to humans aged 55 to 65. All of the improved density measurements reduce the likelihood of a hip fracture, one of the most common causes of disability in the elderly. The researchers also found a reduction in a biomarker that indicates bone breakdown and an increase in the surface area involved in bone formation in the vibrating group.

The scientists theorize that the rhythmic movement of body vibration exercises cells so they work better. Vibration prompts movement of the cell nucleus, which is suspended by numerous threadlike fibers called filaments. 

In addition, the movement releases transcription factors that spur new osteoblasts, the cells that make bone. With age, the balance of bone production versus bone loss and destruction tips to the loss side.

“The filaments get all deformed like springs and then they spring back,” reported lead researcher Dr. Karl H. Wenger, biomedical engineer in the MCG Schools of Graduate Studies and Medicine. 

Doctor Wenger also reported that the vibration technique worked even better on people with slow-healing fractures. In the case of an injury, vibration acts on stem cells, the master controllers of the healing process.

“We think that in fracture healing, you get a more dramatic response. We don’t know exactly why it affects the biology differently but it’s likely because of the extent to which stem cells invade the injured area,” Wenger said.

Osteoporosis affects an estimated 75 million people in Europe, USA and Japan, including over 10 million cases in the United States, and the incidence is rising rapidly due to our aging population. Between 1990 and 2000, there was nearly a 25% increase in hip fractures worldwide. By 2050, the worldwide incidence of hip fracture in men is projected to increase by 310% and 240% in women.

A 10% loss of bone mass in the vertebrae can double the risk of vertebral fractures, and similarly, a 10% loss of bone mass in the hip can result in a 2.5 times greater risk of hip fracture. Nearly 75% of all hip fractures occur in women and about 25% of hip fractures in people over 50 occurs in men. The combined lifetime risk for hip, forearm and vertebral fractures coming to clinical attention is around 40%, equivalent to the risk for cardiovascular disease

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)