May 272012
 

The picture below shows a scroll.

A scroll consists of two separate cylinders.

One end of a length of paper is wrapped around one cylinder,

while the other end of the paper is wrapped around the other cylinder.

 The writing on the paper is revealed by unrolling one scroll until the desired section appears, while simultaneously rolling the undesired sections of paper up on the other cylinder.

The inspiration for the creation of the scroll is the human body. The human body can behave like two large cylinders located approximately as shown in this picture.

The inspiration for connecting the two cylinders together with paper that is rolled and unrolled on the cylinders are sensations produced by forces flowing between the two cylinders within the body 

The design on the side of the paper towel dispenser in the following picture shows how the forces flow between the two cylinders.

The circular ends of the design are the cylinders.

The forces flow from one side of one cylinder,

to the other side of the other cylinder.


That flow pattern is different from the flow pattern of the scroll as can be seen in the following comparison picture.

The paper on the scroll flows between the same side of both cylinders,

while the flow pattern of forces within the body that the scroll is claimed to be based on flows from one side of one cylinder to the other side of the other cylinder.

That picture would seem to contradict the claim of this blog entry that the scroll is based on the flow of forces between the two cylinders within the body. 

That is not necessarily true. There is a practical reason to alter a scroll so the paper flows between the same side of both cylinders.

If a scroll is constructed with the paper flowing between the opposite sides of the two cylinders as shown by the dotted lines on this picture,

there is a gap between the paper on the top of one cylinder and whatever surface the scroll is resting on.

It would be very easy to puncture or tear a scroll with a gap underneath one side because there is no support for the paper. That is why scrolls with the paper flowing between the same side of both cylinders are constructed,

so both ends of the paper are supported by the surface the scroll is resting on.

That difference between the flow pattern of the paper on a scroll and the flow pattern of the forces between the cylinders within the human body, does not mean the claim of this blog entry is false.

It just means that the inventor of the scroll made an adjustment to the sensations he felt from within his own body that inspired him to invent the scroll.

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