Dec 122010
 

The video linked below is located at YouTube

The Jellyfish View of the Human Body

A webpage duplicate of the video is provided for those who prefer to read, and for more leisurely study.

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This video is about The Jelly Fish View of the Human Body

According to Darwin’s Theory of Evolution, human beings evolved from a single cell floating in the ocean.

That single cell evolved into, a fish,

 

an amphibian,

 

a reptile,

 

an insect,

 

a bird,

 

a mammal,

 

and finally into a human being.

 

According to Happeh Theory, the human body retains the characteristics of all of the creatures on the path of evolution, somewhere within itself. That means that somewhere within the human body can be found one or more characteristics of, a fish,

 

an amphibian,

 

a reptile,

 

an insect,

 

a bird,

 

a mammal,

 

and even the single cell floating in the ocean.

 

The Jelly Fish View of the Human Body, uses the characteristics of an ocean creature called a jelly fish, to provide insight into the construction and behavior of the human body.

Here is a picture of an example jellyfish.

 

A jellyfish has two major characteristics pertinent to this video. There is a large mass at the top of the jellyfish,

 

that is usually hemispherical in shape.

 

Underneath the hemispherical shape are tendrils or tentacles,

 

that hang down to various lengths.

 

Please watch the following video clip of a live jellyfish, to get a feel for how a jellyfish moves, and how the body of a jellyfish reacts to movement.

To move through the water, the jelly fish flexes the hemispherically shaped main body.

After the main body flexes, the flexing motion continues to travel down through the tentacles of the jellyfish.

The flexing motion traveling down through the tentacles,

 

has the shape of a wave.

 

The main body and the tentacles of a jelly fish, do not behave like two separate, independent objects. The main body and the tentacles of a jelly fish, behave like one connected piece, from the top of the jelly fish, down to the bottom of the tentacles. Any movement of the main body of the jelly fish, is transmitted from the top to the bottom of each tentacle.

According to Happeh Theory, the human body has the ability to move like a jelly fish. The human body can behave is if it is one large connected piece. A movement of any part of the human body, can be transmitted throughout the rest of the body, in the same way any movement of the main body of the jelly fish, is transmitted throughout the length of each tentacle.

The concept of the human body behaving as one large connected piece, is one of the foundation ideas of Happeh Theory. The Jelly Fish View of the Human Body, provides a way to visualize how the human body, can act as one large connected piece.

Here is a picture of a jelly fish.

 

A transparent human body is superimposed over the jelly fish picture,

 

so the head of the human body is aligned with the top of the jelly fish.

 

The tentacles of the jelly fish hang down over the rest of the human body.

 

The next part of the video will show the jelly fish moving. Please watch the relationship between the tentacles of the jelly fish, and the human body.

As before, the video showed the the main body of the jelly fish flexing, and the flexing motion traveling down the entire length of each tentacles. The purpose of this demonstration is to help visualize the human body, moving in the same way the jelly fish moves.

Using the demonstration as a guide, visualize the head of the human body flexing like the main body of the jelly fish.

Then visualize the flexing motion of the human head traveling down through the human body.

The same demonstration will now be applied to the arms and the legs, because if the human body can behave as one large connected piece, any movement of any part of the body, would be transmitted throughout the rest of the human body

This picture shows the main body of the jelly fish superimposed over the hand,

 

with the tentacles of the jelly fish running over the arm and into the body.

 

When the jelly fish is shown moving,

the movement of the main body of the jelly fish, which is located at the hand, travels all the way down the tentacles, which are superimposed over the arm and the body.

The implication of the demonstration, is that a movement of the hand can travel through the arm, and into the body.

This picture shows the main body of the jelly fish superimposed on the foot,

 

with the tentacles running up through the leg and into the body.

 

When the jellyfish is shown moving,

the movement of the main body of the jelly fish, which is located at the foot, travels all the way down the tentacles, which are superimposed over the leg and body. The implication of the demonstration, is that a motion of the foot will travel up through the legs, and into the body.

The head, the hand, and the foot, were used in the previous demonstrations. According to Happeh Theory, the phenomenon shown in the demonstrations can take place at any location of the human body. Any motion originating at any location of the human body, can be transmitted throughout the rest of the body.

This property of the human body behaving as one large connected piece, can be used to explain many different phenomenon of the human body.

One of the main claims of Happeh Theory, is that masturbation can make a human being go blind in one eye. Because the genitals are located between the legs, and the eyes are located in the head, many people do not understand how masturbation can cause one eye to go blind

The demonstrations presented in this video, provide one way to visualize how masturbation of the genitals at the groin, can affect the eyes up in the head.

The genitals are treated as the center of action, like the head, the hand, and the foot, were the center of action for the other demonstrations. This picture shows the main body of the jelly fish located at the genitals.

 

The tentacles of the jellyfish travel up through the body, and into the head and eyes.

 

When the main body of the jelly fish moves,

the movement travels up the length of the tentacles superimposed over the body, and up into the head. The tentacles that are superimposed over the eyes move back and forth and up and down,

every time the main body of the jelly fish moves.

That is how masturbation of the genitals at the groin, can cause the eyes located up in the head, to go blind. Because the human body has the ability to behave as one large connected piece, the physical actions of masturbation at the groin, can travel through the body up to the eyes, where the physical forces of masturbation, interfere with the proper functioning of the eyes, causing them to go blind.

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