Sep 152010
 

The video linked below is located at YouTube.

The Double Cylinder View of the Human Body

A webpage duplicate of the video is also provided for those who prefer to read, and for more leisurely study.

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This video is Part 1 on the Double Cylinder View of the Human Body

According to the Double Cylinder View of the Human Body, the human body behaves as if it is constructed of two large cylinders located as shown in this picture.

The cylinders are approximately centered on each leg.

The diameter of each cylinder is large enough so that one side lies along the center of the body,

while the other side extends outwards far enough to enclose the entire side of the body.

Support for the validity of the Double Cylinder View of the Human Body, can be found in an overhead picture of the Double Cylinder View of the Human Body, like the picture shown here.

As outlined in this next picture,

the back of the meeting point of the two cylinders has a particular shape. The shape is two curves approaching each other until they finally meet.

The center of the back of the human body has a similar shape as emphasized in this picture.

 

The spine is located in a depression in the center of the back,

 

that each side of the back curves down into.

The front of the cylinders have the same shape at their meeting point as the back of the cylinders as shown here.

In this picture,

the head obscures the front of the body.

If the head is moved back out of the way as shown in this picture,

it is possible to see that there is a depression in the center of the front of the chest.

This next picture outlines the depression in the chest,

 

to show that it has a similar shape to the shape created by meeting point at the front of the two cylinders.

 

Both cylinders have been made partially transparent in this front view picture,

 

so that the relationship between the two cylinders and the entire human body can be seen.

The cylinders in the overhead view can also be made transparent as shown here,

 

to reveal the relationship between the two cylinders and the human body from the overhead view.

The cylinders in this demonstration picture are the size they are,

 

so their relationship to the human body can be clearly seen.

 

The diameter of both cylinders can be different from what is shown in the picture,

 

and still adhere to the definition of the Double Cylinder View of the Human Body.

 

The construction of each of these cylinders is exactly the same, as the construction of the cylinder from the Single Cylinder View of the Human Body. Each cylinder of the Double Cylinder View of the Human Body, is constructed of layers that run radially from the center of each cylinder to the outside of each cylinder.

The layers do not run straight from the center of each cylinder to the outside of each cylinder, as shown in this example.

 

The layers follow a curved path shown in this picture,

 

as they travel from the center of each cylinder to the outer edge of each cylinder.

There are relatively few lines representing layers in this picture,

 

so that the picture looks clear.

 

Each cylinder of the Double Cylinder View of the Human Body, is actually constructed of an infinite number of similarly curved layers, that are so close together they present the appearance of a solid surface.

One of the main uses of the Double Cylinder View of the Human Body, is in describing how Asian kung fu and martial arts work. The human body is naturally divided into two identical sides. Each one of the identical cylinders from the Double Cylinder View of the human body, can model the behavior of one of the identical sides of the real human body.

The types of movements possible by a pair of cylindrical shapes, are especially conducive to explaining why the movements of Asian kung fu and martial arts, are performed in the way that they are.

 

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